To answer your question, you only get taxed on the money you make from the money in a taxable account. So if you put $10,000 in a taxable account and it pays you $200 worth of dividends and grows to be worth $11,000, you would just be taxed on the $200 worth of dividends (when you receive them) and the $1,000 of capital gains (when you sell the investment). You were already taxed on the $10,000 so you wouldn’t be taxed again. Make sense?
This is what I what I hear. Sell all your stuff, except for a tent, and move to the woods so you will never have to pay rent or utilities again. Joking aside, I actually come across a blog that promoted dumpster diving for food. No thank you! Realistically, most of us will not want to do the things required to retire at 30, 40 or 50. In fact, many people who are reading this likely are not saving enough to maintain their current standard of living during their golden years, if they retired at the age of 70. It pains me to report that about 21% of people have zero, zilch, nada saved for retirement, according to the Northwestern Mutual's 2018 Planning & Progress Study.

Given the growth in the sharing economy, your junk can start to pay for itself. For example, if you have some awesome vintage furniture inherited from your grandmother sitting in a storage unit, you can rent this out to photographers for their “styled shoots” which are becoming all the rage. If your furniture is more modern but you still can't bear to get rid of it – perhaps a home stager will be interested.

Photos of people can only be sold for commercial use if they've signed a 'model release' that gives you permission to use their image (children need a parent/guardian to sign). Without a release, these photos can still be sold for editorial use, as long as they were taken in a public place – eg, if you submitted a 'breaking news' shot with people in the background. If there's any doubt, always ask permission.

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What does financial independence from parents mean


When I took the plunge it was paradise for about 3 months, but got bored of the lazy days, warm beaches, and amazing sunsets. Kind of like the big island once the nature wears off. I was drinking more. I know some of you may think I am an alcoholic, but I have never been, but I did not like that I was drinking more. I also got a dangerous reputation for having money. I never showed real wealth, but I tend to give money away especially for education and this caused some jealousy. The ladies started to have more interest in me, and the local men did not always appreciate it. An analogy could be a celebrity with money and time off. I am no celebrity. I eventually moved to a major city and enrolled in a language school, because I could not adjust to just being alive. Two years later I returned to my career in the bay area after meeting my partner from Japan who is a well-known designer in those circles. You have never heard of her. Sometimes she designs hands bags for fashion industry and secret startups. I only mentioned her because I think the goal is to find something you enjoy and get paid for it. Why would she not want to work. Semi-retirement has been a better path for me. Maybe it’s like doubles tennis, I will play that when I can’t run well anymore and I’m getting there.

financial freedom blueprint


- Bonds vs. Bond Funds: p. 289 says "One nice feature of bonds is that you know exactly how your bond investments will grow each year, so the income is guaranteed." Is it? No, no it's not at all - especially if you're using bond FUNDS like the author suggests. If you hold an actual bond to maturity, it works slightly differently. Either way, that bond income is not "guaranteed."

- Bonds vs. Bond Funds: p. 289 says "One nice feature of bonds is that you know exactly how your bond investments will grow each year, so the income is guaranteed." Is it? No, no it's not at all - especially if you're using bond FUNDS like the author suggests. If you hold an actual bond to maturity, it works slightly differently. Either way, that bond income is not "guaranteed."
Of course, it’s also important to note that money isn’t the thing that makes you truly rich — it’s the freedom that comes from pursuing whatever brings you joy and provides you will fulfillment that makes you rich. The whole point of financial freedom is that once you become financially free, you have more choices of how to live your life and spend your days.
If you have 20 years left to live and only require $60,000 a year, having $1,200,000 can also be considered enough even if you make zero return. The only problem is that your purchasing power will decline by ~2% a year due to inflation. The other problem is that you don’t know exactly how many years you have left to live. Therefore, it’s always better to have more rather than less.
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