In this chapter I talk a lot about how to reduce your biggest expenses and that you are going to be able to save the most money where you spend the most money. I also talk a lot about traveling the world for free using credit card travel rewards. Because I’ve gotten so many questions on how to do this from readers I created an Introduction to Credit Card Rewards Guide.
I’ve always considered $10M to be a pretty decent goal that could fund a lifestyle + raising children without worries. Unfortunately I’m 32 right now so I won’t be able to hit that by 35. With some diligent saving, reasonable investment returns and some good performance at work that might be possible by 40. If I hit $5M at 35 I would start considering quitting my job more seriously. I grew up in the midwest, if I went back to somewhere with a lower cost of living, $200k on a 4% withdrawal rate would probably be sufficient for a pretty good life. Especially if combined with a less stressful side job even if it only made $30k-$40k/year. I’m just very risk averse and even though I save far more than I spend, I’m motivated by money (yes I know that sounds terrible but it’s honest). So it would be hard for me to quit a highly lucrative job just as my earnings are really ramping and exchange it for the unknown of semi-retirement.
We set up a business and personal budget for ourselves and include savings goals. Then to keep ourselves accountable we review our budget monthly. This keeps us on track to reaching our financial goals. I'd recommend setting up a system that works best for you and your family. Just writing down your goals will help you start the process. But, reviewing them daily and having honest conversations about where you are financially will determine your success or failure in becoming financially free.
I am a small animal vet in the Washington DC area. Vet school loans and housing have taken their toll. I would like to retire at 60 (I just turned 52), and reach budget or baseline. Blockbuster isn’t a reality. Choose your career well– I love what I do, but sometimes wish it paid more. Semi-retirement may also be an option. Thank you, Sam, for a great post (as always).
I personally do not consider any capital gains or paper gains as part of my retirement income. Any capital gains are one off. It’s safer this way because it’s important to focus on building recurring passive income sources. Hopefully, my gains from my rental house sale in 2017 will be properly deployed to earn future income. But I’m not touching those gains for spending.
Even though I passed the point where my savings could cover my essential expenses quite a while ago, I’ve decided to keep working and pad my balances a bit more. Since I’ll likely have plenty of buffer by the time I actually pull the plug on work, I plan to just maintain my current portfolio, which consists primarily of low-cost, stock market index funds. Since I could always work again if necessary, I’m happy to take on a bit more risk for higher potential returns.
In this chapter I talk a lot about how to reduce your biggest expenses and that you are going to be able to save the most money where you spend the most money. I also talk a lot about traveling the world for free using credit card travel rewards. Because I’ve gotten so many questions on how to do this from readers I created an Introduction to Credit Card Rewards Guide.
If you're ready to enter the ecommerce fray, you could sell your own stuff. Of course, along with selling your own stuff on your own website comes a whole slew of both responsibilities and technical configuration and requirements. For starters, you'll need a website and a hosting account. You'll also need a merchant account like ones offered by Stripe or PayPal. Then you'll need to design that site, build a sales funnel, create a lead magnet and do some email marketing.

financial freedom challenge


Work wise i'm a bit fortunate to still work at a good company and managers, so it's not a big deal to continue working, although the work can be repetitive and lack of challenge, i consider that a blessing. Still, once you know the date it seems hard to keep still, but the anxiety seems more from the retirement itself (what would I do), rather than the current work. I think for people who are fortunate enough to not worry about financials after retirement, our real challenge is the lifestyle choice and psychological change we need to adapt to.
Hi Suba, I’m glad you brought up health insurance. I decided to leave off my explanation for why my health insurance costs will decrease after FI, in order to keep the post a bit shorter, but it is important to note why. Our plan after FI is to live for 6 months in Scotland (my wife’s home), travel around for 1-3 months in America (visiting my friends and family), and live for 3-5 months somewhere else in the world (Southeast Asia, South America, or another low-cost destination). Since we’ll be based in the UK, the majority of our year will be health insurance free (thanks to the NHS). The other six months of the year, we’ll be able to cover ourselves with a travel insurance policy. These policies can usually be purchased for £300 per year in the UK, so $50 a month seemed like a conservative estimate for half-a-year’s worth of insurance (this UK-based travel blog article discusses travel insurance costs).

Watch Them Completely Ignoring Financial Freedom And Learn The Lesson


No matter what method you choose to make money online, understand that you might be able to make some money fast, but for the sizable returns, you'll need significant sweat equity. However, a year from now, you'll be happy you started today. Remember, time is far more valuable than money. Focus on creating passive income streams that will free up your time so that you can quit the rat race and focus on the things that matter. 

financial freedom controls


I think too many people become over-focused on their number, on achieving what you call basic FI and I call independence. They’re so dialed in on that that they ignore the fact that they’re gradually achieving greater independence all the time. That’s too bad. I think folks would be happier if they could take the time to appreciate their state, you know?

Make money online


I know it can be scary to make change happen, but think about it: if you don’t take action now, what does your financial future really look like? All you need to do is take one step. Do one thing every day that will get you closer to your own financial dream — the key lies in taking action. You simply cannot have something without doing something to earn it. So, if you truly want it, ladies, it’s yours for the taking.
Though it can take a while to build up enough cash to put a 20% down payment on an investment property (the typical lender minimum), they can snowball fairly quickly. The key here is to correctly project income and expenses in order to calculate cash flow (the free cash you can put in your pocket after all associated property expenses have been paid). However you have to be sure to include the cost of a property manager in your calculations unless you want to manage the property yourself. Even with a property manager, you may be required to make large repair decisions every now and then – so while this is not a 100% passive activity, you are not directly trading your time for money like traditional employment.
Im wanting to invest in some sort of real estate investment, to make a passive income and starting with 300 to 1k but im wanting to start making money, like at least 400 to 700 a month and i know there’s 100s of ways to make money, in real estate. But can you please suggest a real estate investment, for beginners and where i could starting earning at least 500 a month, as that’s got to be something and im not looking for yearly income?!
“A good reason to retire early is that you have an alternate vision for your life that you are eager to pursue, but which you can’t pursue while employed full time,” Hester said. “Achieving financial independence allowed us to leave that career chapter of our lives from a place of gratitude and appreciation, and move onto our next chapter that we’re in control of.”
For Vanessa and I, financial freedom is our primary long-term financial goal. We appreciate the flexibility and freedom that accompanies a large pool of savings, and we would rather forego consumption than live dependent on a monthly paycheck. Although we haven’t yet achieved permanent (or luxurious) financial freedom, we are in a great position. We are completely debt-free, and have accumulated enough assets to purchase a prolonged period of freedom. And at this point, that’s all that we desire.

If you are new to the financial planning process, it’s important to remember you don’t need to go from zero to sixty overnight. Just like a fitness trainer would be hesitant to recommend an all-out body straining routine on your first day in the gym, I wouldn’t expect someone to start implementing advanced planning techniques in the first week. Pick a reasonable and attainable goal, and get used to achieving small wins on your track to financial independence.
I have about 1 year’s worth of expenses saved. Hoping to get to 25x expenses by the time I’m 30. I’m currently 23 and just starting my first job out of college. I think I can definitely achieve that, but I’m nervous about performing well at work. Hopefully it all works out and I can choose to quit if I’d like early in life. I’m hoping I actually enjoy work, but I am thinking that is asking for too much…
26. Services – You can offer a paid service, such as life coaching, blog coaching, goal setting or financial planning. Just be sure to investigate all the legal implications and make sure you’re not claiming to be a professional if you’re not one. With a service like this, you’re basically using your blog to sell yourself. You’ll need to convince people that you’re worth buying and then be able to back up your claims once they purchase your service.
I actually went back to the post and looked closer. Out of the first 13 ways listed, only one requires that you have house. None of the rest require you to have a house or a car. Of course, there are 11 more ideas in addition to those first 13 and some of those do require you to start with an investment. However, there’s nearly always a way to create passive income if you are willing to put in the time and work involved. If you do not find something that works for you in this post, check out our other posts. If you’re constantly on the lookout for ways to create passive income I’m betting you will find a way that works for you. Be diligent and I bet you can do it, even in South Africa. Good luck!
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