What if a budget of $2,000/month would provide a significant increase in satisfaction? Perhaps the additional $500/month could be used for hobbies, entertainment, and travel, all of which make you far happier in your life. But $2000/month in expenses is more than your portfolio can support, which means you’re headed in the wrong direction (back to temporary freedom).

Whatever They Told You About Financial Freedom Is Dead WrongAnd Heres Why


Our plan is to continue on until I hit 65 when I can transition my healthcare to Medicare, our daughter will be out of college and almost finished with grad school and close to transitioning to her own healthcare plan which just leaves the need to cover my wife for another 3 years, unless she wishes to soldier on a little longer on the company plan.

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Safety. Shit happens, so it’s best to create a Safety Net savings account with $500–$1000 for emergencies. Now listen: do not touch this money unless there is a true emergency (car repairs, medical bills, job loss, etc.). Your Safety Net will allow you to stay on budget even when life punches you in the face. Over time, once you’re out of debt (step 3 below), your Safety Net will grow to include several months of income. But for now, worry only about the first $500–$1000 to start, which you’ll want to keep in a separate Safety Net account to avoid temptation (more on that below).
It’s funny you mention the different psychological levels of financial independence. I read a lot of blogs and there is this one Blogger who goes on every single other blog and shouts from the top of his lungs that he is a multimillionaire. But he has no self-confidence because his wife still works. His writing oozes insecurity probably due to the lack of friends, lack of success from his site, and lack of purpose. He also likes to write about his investments, but he’ll only publish his winners and never his losers and he’ll never talk about them when he does make an investment.

Early hominids seem to have started with incipient ideas of wealth,[citation needed] similar to that of the great apes. But as tools, clothing, and other mobile infrastructural capital became important to survival (especially in hostile biomes), ideas such as the inheritance of wealth, political positions, leadership, and ability to control group movements (to perhaps reinforce such power) emerged. Neandertal societies had pooled funerary rites and cave painting which implies at least a notion of shared assets that could be spent for social purposes, or preserved for social purposes. Wealth may have been collective.
It’s insane how much money you can make flipping items (buying a deal and then selling at a big profit). You know all those people who are selling things on eBay? Well, some of them are making tens of thousands of dollars a month doing it. Sound like a lot of work? It’s really not. The key is building a good strategy for finding, buying, uploading, and shipping items.
Late to the game, Sam, but I like where you, J.D., and others are going with this line of reasoning. Understanding levels of financial independence and financial security are very much needed. I worry that our main message is a turn off to a lot of people because they can’t possibly fathom saving 25 times their annual living expenses or more. For a lot of people, just being able to spend slightly less than they earn and having a modest emergency fund is their idea of financial nirvana. It would be nice if we could somehow champion these people and show them that they are welcomed members of our community. Cheers.
There is so much demand for freelance writers and you can pretty much write about anything you want. Another nice benefit of freelance writing is the ability to sign monthly retainers with bloggers of companies who need writers. This means you can charge a set amount per month ($1,000 – $5,000) for a number of articles. If you do this for a few clients then you can easily turn a writing business into a $10,000/month + side hustle.
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